equipment | KION North America | Page 2

Tag Archives: equipment

Best Safety Boots for Manufacturers

When you think about safety in the warehouse, protecting your feet may not be the first thing that comes to mind. But with all of the heavy lifting that goes on in warehouses, your feet can be injured very easily. Thankfully, there are different varieties of safety boots made to keep your feet from harm. The following information on different kinds of safety boots can help you decide which pair is the best for your manufacturing needs:

Steel-toed

Steel-toed boots are one of the most common types of safety footwear, especially in the warehouse. The toe area is capped with steel to prevent injury or harm to the toes. Steel is also generally recommended over other kinds of safety-toed shoe materials, like aluminum or plastic.

Metal instep

Footwear with metal insteps protects the foot from all outward injuries. Metal insteps are especially helpful for protecting against sharp objects like nails or glass, keeping them from penetrating the shoe and reaching the foot. This type of safety footwear is also especially helpful in large industrial warehouses.

Steel insole

Steel insoles can be inserted into the a boot to help prevent joint problems and strain. Steel insoles are more common for those already suffering from joint issues and for employees’ whose jobs put strain on their joints. Those who operate heavy machinery with pedals may find comfort from putting steel insoles in their boots.

Metatarsal

Shoes with metatarsal protection are also known as drop hazards because they protect the upper part of the foot, meaning they are especially helpful in preventing damage from falling equipment or objects. This type of footwear protects the toe area as well.  

Electric hazard

Electrical hazard boots have special soles designed to help reduce the potential of employees getting shocked from high voltage circuits and electricity. Employees that work around circuits, high voltage machines, and wiring should wear these protective boots. Electric hazards are extremely common and can lead to serious injury, even death. 

Following appropriate safety procedures is essential to the safety and productivity of a warehouse. Remember that safety procedures go beyond what your employer or supervisor mandates, and that you need to look out for yourself as well.

When to Retire Your Forklift

Forklifts are invaluable pieces of machinery necessary for the efficiency of any warehouse. A good forklift can last up up to around 10,000-20,000 hours without needing major repairs, but unfortunately these machines do not last forever. When a forklift has exceeded its economic life, meaning the cost of operation exceeds the value it provides, or the forklift has become unsafe to operate, the forklift is ready to be replaced. Waiting too long to retire a forklift can cost organizations considerable money. Here are a few signs that indicate it’s time for your forklift to retire.

Increased Maintenance Costs

As mentioned above, if the cost of maintaining a forklift has become higher than the value of its performance, it’s time to trade the lift in. Think about a forklift like you would a car- if making repairs or maintenance costs more than the value of the car, you know its time is over. Small repairs will be necessary after the first few thousand miles and several years, and major repairs are typical once the lift reaches about 10,000 hours.

Hours

Keep track of the number of hours your forklift is in operation. When the lift has exceeded 10,000 hours, you may want to pay attention to how it’s performing and keep an eye out for any issues. It would also be a good time to look into options for your next lift. Once a lift reaches 20,000 hours, retirement and replacement should be a priority. However, these numbers will vary based on the intensity of the lift’s usage.

Decreased Productivity

If a forklift is down for repairs more often than it is out on the floor lifting loads, it’s probably time to retire it. You can lose a considerable amount of money due to the lost hours of work as well as the costs for repairs.

High Number of Work Orders

A high number of work orders indicates that a forklift has been down more than its being used. If a lift has needed many repairs in recent months, even small repairs, it indicates there is a problem and the lift is nearing the end of its working days.

Out of Date Features

An out of date forklift is an unsafe forklift. A telling sign that your lift is too old is if its features are not up to date with the most recent changes and improvements. Especially when it comes to safety features, having an out of date machine can be very dangerous and leave warehouses liable for any issues that may result.

Tips for Reducing Warehouse Costs

The list of costs required to run a warehouse is long. From labor to handling inventory to equipment and more, running a warehouse can get very expensive very quickly. However, there are practices that can reduce costs without diminishing productivity and efficiency. Check out these tips to reduce warehouse costs while maintaining and even improving productivity.

Labor management

Labor costs are one of the largest expenses when it comes to managing a warehouse. The following are just a few of the many ways to effectively reduce labor costs and improve employee productivity.

Employee training is essential. Employees should be trained not only in their specific line of work, but also informed about the organization’s goals and expectations of its employees. Cross training is another way to improve productivity and ensure the warehouse operations continue to run smoothly in someone’s absence.  

Investing in employee training pays off in the long run, so long as employees stay with an organization long enough. Hiring someone is an investment, and if an employee doesn’t stick around for too long, your company can lose money. By focusing on employee retention, your investments can pay off.

Reducing space and optimizing storage

Another large contribution to overall warehouse expenses is land costs. It’s possible to work in a smaller, less expensive space by optimizing storage. Here are a couple of helpful storage practices to keep in mind.

Racking allows you to optimize storage space and store inventory efficiently. Use racking to increase the number of pallets stored in your space and the square footage it allows. There are different ways of racking, but one common use is to build tall and narrow. The right racking system depends on your inventory, so make sure you are using the safest method possible.

Aisles are imperative when it comes to navigating through a warehouse and allowing forklifts and other equipment to get to inventory, and they can unfortunately be quite a space consumer. But by knowing the dimensions of various lifts that need to move through your aisles and get to certain items, you can reduce aisle space for optimal use. Different lifts are required for different products, so sort your inventory accordingly with the equipment required to handle and move it.

Inventory management

After optimizing your storage space, inventory management is the next step to reduce warehouse costs. Racking and sorting items in aisles according to the equipment that needs to reach them is a start, but there are other ways to manage your inventory in a cost and production efficient manner. Slotting refers to figuring out where each item should be located in your warehouse. An effective slotting strategy will ensure that products are in the right place at the right time, making handling of materials easier and faster.

Optimize equipment use

From forklifts to storage structures and more, equipment is another expense that can become quite costly in a warehouse. Here are a few things to keep in mind to get the best out of your equipment without paying an arm and a leg.

First, consider renting or leasing equipment rather than buying. There are different advantages for renting and buying, so evaluate your options and see which would option would work best for your organization.  

Another cost to keep in mind when it comes to equipment is repair expenses. Use preventive maintenance to avoid equipment failure. Be sure to regularly check the conditions of your equipment to avoid failure and any possible incidents or injuries that may result.

Creating a Warehouse Safety Checklist

In a warehouse, there are many safety hazards that can be dangerous if they are not properly addressed. Having a safety checklist is a great way to identify any potential hazards in the workplace. Once those hazards are identified, they can be dealt with to prevent any harmful incidents and maintain a safe work environment. There are many aspects of warehouse safety to take into consideration, from handling materials correctly to electrical and fire safety.

The following are some important aspects of warehouse safety to keep in mind when creating a checklist.

General Warehouse Safety

When it comes to general warehouse safety, there are easily preventable hazards that can result in injury if not dealt with properly. Some items on your checklist should include:

  • Exposed or open loading docks are blocked or roped off, as well as any other areas where employees could potentially fall four feet or more.
  • Floor and aisles are cleared of clutter such as spills, electrical cords, or other items that might cause an employee to slip or fall.
  • Employees performing physical work are given adequate time for rest breaks to avoid fatigue.
  • The warehouse is well ventilated.
  • Employees are trained to safely work in the environment (hot/humid or cold).

Materials Handling Checklist

As safety concerns become more specific, checklists become more extensive. This is true of the list for safely handling materials. Here are just a few of the important items to include on your checklist:

  • There is safe clearance for equipment and materials through aisles and doorways.
  • Motorized vehicles or mechanized equipment are checked daily or prior to use.
  • Vehicles are shut off and the brakes are set before loading/unloading.
  • Securing chains, ropes, slings, etc. are adequate for required job to be performed.
  • Covers and/or guardrails have been provided to protect workers from stair openings in floors, equipment pits, and other hazards.

Electrical Safety

There are many essential safety steps to take when it comes to electrical equipment, exposed wires, grounding, and more. Some items on this checklist include:

  • Employees are instructed to perform preliminary inspections and/or appropriate tests before beginning work on electrical equipment or lines.
  • Portable electric equipment and tools are either grounded or double insulated.
  • Exposed wiring or cords with frayed or damaged insulation are repaired or replaced immediately.
  • Flexible cords and cables are free of splices and/or taps.
  • Employees who regularly work around energized electrical equipment or lines are instructed in CPR methods.

While these guidelines are important in beginning to create your warehouse safety checklist, they are just the tip of the safety iceberg. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration has some great guidelines and templates for general warehouse safety, as well as specific safety concerns, such as fire safety, floor and wall openings safety, and much more.

How to Properly Load a Forklift

One of the most important aspects of forklift safety is properly loading and unloading the forklift’s load. An improperly loaded forklift can cause instability and potentially lead to an accident. Take the following steps when loading, operating, and unloading a forklift:

First, check the lift’s load limit, which can be found on its data plate, and make sure you are not exceeding the weight listed. An overloaded lift may result in tip over. Also try to distribute the weight of the load evenly, and spread the forks as widely as possible in order to do so.

When it comes to positioning the load, place it according to the recommended load center, and keep the load as close to the front wheels as possible. Be sure the load is secure and stable before moving, using the appropriate fixtures for the type of load, like a carpet spike or drum grappler. When lifting heavier loads, tilt the mast of the forklift back and keep the load close to the wheels to avoid the possibility of tipping. Also be sure to tip the mast back a bit before moving the lift.

Once you have the load in place and are ready to carry, keep the forks six to ten inches above the ground to avoid any potential hazards and keep the load tilted back. Do not raise or lower the load while in motion, travel at an appropriate speed, and be sure to stay aware of your surroundings, looking in the direction you’re moving.

When you are in position and ready to unload, move the load slowly into position. Check your surroundings to make sure you have adequate room for overhead clearance and have two to three inches of clearance at the sides and back of the load. Tilt the load forward and then lower it. Next, level the forks before pulling them back slowly.

Lastly, always be sure the lift and other required materials are up to date and aren’t damaged or deformed. Keeping up with proper maintenance schedules will ensure the forklifts are operating at their best.

While following these steps will help ensure safe and stable forklift operation, operators should be trained regarding the specific needs of their workplace and loading requirements.

Forklift Safety Training Tips for Your Warehouse

One of the most important aspects of operating an efficient warehouse is safety, especially when it comes to operating heavy machinery like forklifts. The Occupational Health and Safety Administration has certain requirements that employers and warehouses must follow when it comes to forklift operation, and for good reason. Properly training and educating employees about forklift safety will help your warehouse to not only be safer, but also more productive. The fewer accidents that occur in your warehouse, the less it will cost you, whether saving on costs of repairing damages or insurance costs. Here are a few tips for developing a forklift safety training system in your warehouse.

Teach general safety and operation principles

There are many general tips for safely operating forklifts, regardless of make, model, or workplace conditions. These principles include proper loading and unloading methods, proper weight distribution, paying attention to load capacities, and more. Understanding the basics of forklift operation is the first step to a safe warehouse.

Tailor training to the specifics of your workplace and equipment

While understanding the general safety and forklift operation are necessary, employees need to be trained to the specific conditions of their workplace. Every warehouse operates differently and under different conditions. Equipment, practices, and organization vary from warehouse to warehouse, so what an operator may know from previous experience in warehouses or with forklifts will not necessarily apply in new conditions. Make sure your employees are trained to specifically operate the type of forklift used in your warehouse and are fully aware of the conditions of their workplace.

Educate more than just forklift operators

A common misconception about forklift safety training is that it only need apply to workers who will be operating the lifts. However, it is important for all warehouse workers to understand the dangers and safety precautions associated with forklifts. Even if an employee will not personally be operating a lift, every person working in the warehouse will be around forklifts, and is therefore at risk to the dangers such powerful machinery poses.

Evaluate safety methods and provide refresher training

Safety training is not a one and done system. Safety training should be adjusted as warehouses grow, adopt new equipment, or hire more workers. Therefore, warehouses need to frequently evaluate the safety methods in place and adapt accordingly. Especially if an accident has occurred or there has been any evidence of unsafe operation, warehouses need to provide refresher training for their employees.

Forklift safety is just one aspect of safety training that your warehouse needs to implement. Warehouses that provide comprehensive safety training for their employees are more productive, experience fewer accidents, and have higher job satisfaction. A safe warehouse is a successful warehouse, so kickstart your warehouse’s safety training with our tips today.  

Electric vs. Hydrogen Powered Forklifts

When it comes to operating an environmentally friendly warehouse, many debate between using electrically-powered versus hydrogen fuel cell-powered forklifts. Both are said to cut down on emissions and certain costs and serve as ideal options for indoor and closed spaces. But which option is better, electric or hydrogen? Here’s how the two compare.

As mentioned above, electric and hydrogen forklifts are the “green” forklift options because they don’t produce any harmful exhaust. Hydrogen fuel cells release water vapor into the air, which is either absorbed or stored in a reservoir. However, the sourcing of the hydrogen muddles the low emissions claim. Hydrogen is produced by reforming natural gas, a process that emits more CO2 into the atmosphere than simply burning the gas would. Because of this, electric forklifts are probably an environmentally better option.

Costs are also a divisive factor among manufacturers who prefer either electric or hydrogen. Electric forklifts have a lower cost per hour for operation and last longer compared to internal combustion systems. Electric also tends to be more affordable when it comes to routine maintenance.

While electric lasts longer than IC models and cost less to fuel, these models have higher upfront costs than IC models- sometimes 20-40% more. Another major issue regarding electric powered forklifts is the time and space the charging process requires. The battery life will likely last a standard 8-hour workday or 6 hours constant use, but a full recharge can take from 8 to 16 hours, with 8 hours to cool as well. Fast charge batteries are available, but can cost up to 20% more than standard issue.

In addition, if you need forklifts for multiple shift operations, you will need to purchase extra batteries and swap them out using a transporter in a battery changing station. The process can take 20 to 45 minutes and eat into both time and warehouse space.

Hydrogen-powered forklifts have electric beat when it comes to time, refueling in less than 3 minutes compared to upwards of 16 hours. But this option has its downsides as well. At first glance, hydrogen fuel cell forklifts do not seem like the most cost efficient method. The fuel costs are not cheap: hydrogen can cost twice as much as the price of an electric battery. The cost to repair equipment can also be staggeringly high.

However, many businesses have found that over time, the hydrogen method is more efficient and cost effective. They last longer, fuel in three minutes, and sustain power for a longer period of time. Companies like Walmart and Nestle Waters, with larger fleet sizes and high productivity, have found that using hydrogen-powered forklifts has lowered operational costs and increased worker productivity. While the initial investment is high, the return on investment can really pay off.

When it comes to choosing between electric and hydrogen-powered forklifts, it’s really up to your business to weigh out the costs and pros and cons of each method. Companies with the capital to initially invest in hydrogen fuel cells may find the method to their liking, as companies like Coca-Cola and Walgreens have, but electric-powered could be more economically sound for smaller companies.

For more information or questions regarding Electric or Hydrogen Powered Forklifts, reach out to a dealer near you.